Contact Us |  

Search form

minimize

Prizes and Honors / George Morey Richardson Latin Translation Prize

Description. The Richardson Latin Translation Prize is open to all UC Berkeley students. A first-place prize and second-place prize are awarded for the best translation of classical English into Ciceronian Latin. 

History of the Prize. The Richardson Latin Translation Prize was established through the will of George Morey Richardson of Berkeley, dated May 16, 1896: "I give and devise to The Regents of the University of California, two lots or parcels of land, situated in Highland Trust, Oakland Township, Alameda County, State of California, to expend the income there or from the proceeds thereof, when sold, for an annual prize known as the 'Richardson Latin Translation Prize,' to be awarded to undergraduates (later to include graduate students) of the University of California for the best translation of classical English into Ciceronian Latin." The prize was established in 1896.

Please review the General Rules for Competitive Prizes.

Contest deadlines vary. Please check the Prizes and Honors home page for this prize's deadline.

George Morey Richardson Latin Translation Prize Passage 2019-20

Frederick Douglass, “Letter to Thomas Auld,” The North Star, September 8, 1848: To Thomas Auld September 3d, 1848 Sir: The long and intimate, though by no means friendly relation which unhappily subsisted between you and myself, leads me to hope that you will easily account for the great liberty which I now take in addressing you in this open and public manner. The same fact may possibly remove any disagreeable surprise which you may experience on again finding your name coupled with mine, in any other way than in an advertisement, accurately describing my person, and offering a large sum for my arrest. In thus dragging you again before the public, I am aware that I shall subject myself to no inconsiderable amount of censure. I shall probably be charged with an unwarrantable, if not a wanton and reckless disregard of the rights and proprieties of private life. There are those North as well as South who entertain a much higher respect for rights which are merely conventional, than they do for rights which are personal and essential. Not a few there are in our country, who, while they have no scruples against robbing the laborer of the hard-earned results of his patient industry, will be shocked by the extremely indelicate manner of bringing your name before the public. Believing this to be the case, and wishing to meet every reasonable or plausible objection to my conduct, I will frankly state the ground upon which I justify myself in this instance, as well as on former occasions when I have thought proper to mention your name in public. All will agree that a man guilty of theft, robbery, or murder, has forfeited the right to concealment and private life; that the community have a right to subject such persons to the most complete exposure. However much they may desire retirement, and aim to conceal themselves and their movements from the popular gaze, the public have a right to ferret them out, and bring their conduct before the proper tribunals of the country for investigation. Sir, you will undoubtedly make the proper application of these generally admitted principles, and will easily see the light in which you are regarded by me. I will not therefore manifest ill temper, by calling you hard names. I know you to be a man of some intelligence, and can readily determine the precise estimate which I entertain of your character. I may therefore indulge in language which may seem to others indirect and ambiguous, and yet be quite well understood by yourself.

Previous Winners


2018-19: 1st prize: Daniel Squire ($1000); 2nd prize: Joshua Benjamin ($500)


2017-18: 1st prize: Daniel Squire ($1,500)


2016-17: 1st prize: Daniel Squire ($1,400)


2015-16: 1st prize: Michael Zellmann-Rohrer ($1,000); 2nd prize: Daniel Squire ($400)


2014-15: 1st prize: Michael Zellman-Rohrer ($1,000); 2nd prize: Tom Recht ($500)


2013-14: 1st prize: Michael Zellmann-Rohrer ($1,500)


2012-13: 1st prize: Jared Hudson and Michael Zellman-Rohrer ($750 each)


2011-12:1st prize: Michael Zellman-Rohrer ($2,000)


2010-11: 1st prize: Jared Hudson ($1,500); 2nd prize: Thomas Hendrickson ($500)


2009-10: 1st prize: Jared Hudson ($2,000)


2008-09: 1st prize: Jared Hudson ($1,500); 2nd prize: Antonia Pham Young ($500)


2007-08: 1st prize: Jared Hudson and Boris Rodin ($1,000 each)


2006-07: 1st prize: Jared Hudson ($2,000)


2005-06:1st prize: Wilson Shearin ($1,500); 2nd prize: Kurt Lampe ($500)


2004-05: 1st prize: Kurt Lampe ($2,000)


2003-04:1st prize: William Michal Short ($1,500); 2nd prize: J. C. Geissmann ($500)


2002-03: 1st prize:William Short ($2,000) 2001-02: 1st prize: Jon Christopher Geissmann ($1,000)


2000-01: 1st prize: Dylan Sailor ($1,000)


1999-00: 1st prize: Dylan Sailor ($1,000); 2nd prize: Amir Baghdadchi ($500)


1998-99: 1st prize: Dylan Sailor ($500)


1997-98: 1st prize: Dylan Sailor ($500)